WWW PICES
PICES 2011 Annual Meeting
Mechanisms of Marine Ecosystem Reorganization in the North Pacific Ocean
October 14-23, 2011, Khabarovsk, Russia
Last update - May 12, 2011
Keynote Speaker

Olga Temnykh
Pacific Research Fisheries Centre, Russia

Keynote Speaker

 
Invited Speakers
Session 1 (Science Board Symposium)
Mechanisms of Marine Ecosystem Reorganization in the North Pacific Ocean

Sukgeun Jung
Jeju National University, Korea

Science Board Symposium S1
Invited Speaker

Sukgeun Jung is a faculty member majoring in fisheries science at Jeju National University, Korea. Sukgeun received B.Sc. from Seoul National University (oceanography) in 1987, M.S. from National Fisheries University of Pusan (now Pukyong National Unviersity) in 1989, and Ph.D. from University of Maryland, College Park with emphasis in fish ecology and fisheries science in 2002. He worked at Chesapeake Biological laboratory of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences for his PostDoc under Professor Edward D. Houde from 2002 to 2006. After returning to Korea in 2006, he worked as a fisheries researcher at National Fisheries R&D institute (2006-2010). His study areas include fisheries oceanography (climate change), stock assessment/management, fish ecology (anchovy and Pacific cod), mathematical biology, and biostatistics. He worked for the secretariat of Korea PICES committee (2008-2010).Currently, he is a lead author for the Chapter 30 (“Open Oceans”) of the 5-th Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC (2010-2014), and a member of PICES FIS committee (2009-present).

 

Maurice Levasseur
Université Laval, Canada

Science Board Symposium S1
Invited Speaker

Maurice Levasseur is a professor in oceanography at Laval University, Quebec, Canada. He worked as a researcher and head of the Primary Productivity Section for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans before moving to Laval University to hold the Canada Research Chair on Plankton-Climate interactions. He is director of Quebec-Ocean, a network regrouping marine scientists and students from four institutions in the province of Quebec, and is director of the joint UQAR-U Laval PhD program in oceanography. Maurice’s main interest focuses on the interactions between the oceans and the atmosphere, including the impact of dust and ash deposition on plankton ecosystems and their capacity to produce the climate active gas dimethylsulfide (DMS). He has worked in different environments, including the North Atlantic, North Pacific and Arctic oceans. During recent years, he has lead the Canadian SOLAS program (2002-2007), the Arctic SOLAS program (2008-2011), and the joint Québec-China research program on the impact of Asian dust on the Northeast Subarctic Pacific.

 

William Sydeman
Farallon Institute for Advanced Ecosystem Research, U.S.A.

Science Board Symposium S1
Invited Speaker

Dr. William J. Sydeman is a veteran marine ecologist with 30 years of experience studying the California Current and other North Pacific marine ecosystems. As President and Senior Scientist with the Farallon Institute for Advanced Ecosystem Research in northern California, Sydeman currently manages a non-profit scientific organization dedicated to the understanding and preservation of healthy marine ecosystems, as well as conducts original research designed to provide the scientific basis for ecosystem management practices and policy reforms consistent with a productive marine world. Sydeman’s specialities include investigations of natural and human-based climate change and the broad implications and influences of ocean currents, weather patterns, fishing practices and coastal development on marine food webs and ecosystem processes. Originally cross-trained in oceanography, quantitative population biology, and ecology at University of California, Sydeman now works on physical-biological interactions on a variety of taxa from seabirds and marine mammals to krill and forage fish. From 2003 to 2010, Sydeman served the PICES community as co-chair of the Advisory Panel for Marine Birds and Mammals.

 

Mitsuo Uematsu
University of Tokyo, Japan

Science Board Symposium S1
Invited Speaker

Dr. Mitsuo Uematsu was born in Osaka, Japan. He received his PhD in Geochemistry from Hokkaido University, Japan in 1980. He then worked on the Sea/Air Exchange (SEAREX) Program at the Center for Atmospheric Chemistry at the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), the University of Rhode Island (URI) as a Research Associate from 1980 to 1987. He then joined the new Department of Marine Science and Technology at Hokkaido Tokai University until 1997. He is currently a Professor and the Director of the Center for International Collaboration, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, at the University of Tokyo. His major research interests include the long-range transport of natural and anthropogenic substances over the ocean, marine aerosol properties, their impact on marine environment and feedback to atmosphere. He has served as a Vice-President of the Oceanographic Society of Japan and as a Chairperson of SOLAS-Japan. He currently serves as a member of the Scientific Committee of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP SC).

 

Igor Volvenko
TINRO-Center, Russia

Science Board Symposium S1
Invited Speaker

Igor V. Volvenko graduated from the Department of Hydrobiology and Ichthyology of the Far Eastern State University (1986), received Ph.D. in Hydrobiology (1995) and a doctoral degree in Ecology (2009). Until 1995 he worked at the Far East Branch RAS: Institute of Marine Biology, Pacific Institute of Geography, Pacific Oceanological Institute, and from 1995 to the present day – at the Laboratory of Applied Biocenology of Pacific Research Fisheries Centre (TINRO) as Leading Researcher. Igor participated in many research expeditions to Japan (East), Okhotsk, Bering Seas and north-western Pacific Ocean. He is an author of more than a hundred scientific publications. Areas of his interest: general biology, ecology, hydrobiology, biogeography, applied statistics, data bases, and GIS.

 
Session 2
Mechanisms of physical-biological coupling forcing biological "hotspots"

Jürgen Alheit
Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Germany

Session 2 Invited Speaker

Jürgen Alheit received his BSc in Marine Biology from Liverpool University (England) and his PhD in Fisheries from Kiel University (Germany). He has worked inter alia at the Peruvian Fisheries Institue (IMARPE) in Peru, for the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in Paris and the Alfred-Wegener-Institut in Bremerhaven. His current position is at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde, Germany. He was a member of the Scientific Steering Committee of GLOBEC, a co-founder and co-chair SPACC/GLOBEC and the chair of the German GLOBEC project. His main interest are comparative studies of the impact of climate variability on marine ecosystems in which small pelagic schooling fish are important. His hobby is introducing his colleagues to German Riesling wine.

Jürgen holds the bottle

 

Igor Belkin
University of Rhode Island, U.S.A.

Session 2 Invited Speaker

Igor Belkin received PhD in Physical Oceanography in 1987 from Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russia, for his studies of ocean stratification. As a sea-going oceanographer, he studied ocean circulation and oceanic fronts in 11 expeditions in all five oceans, from 78°N to 78°S. Since 1991, he continued his research in the USA as a visiting scientist with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University (1991-1995) and Ocean Climate Laboratory, NODC/NOAA (1994-1997). In 1998, he joined the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island to conduct a global survey of oceanic fronts from satellite data, the ongoing project that branched into several international collaborative projects. Recently, he developed a new algorithm for oceanic front detection from satellite data that has been successfully used worldwide to map chlorophyll fronts as well as SST fronts. Presently, he works with several international groups on frontal oceanography applications in fish habitat characterization. Dr. Igor Belkin has authored more than 100 papers and a monograph and edited four special volumes on oceanic fronts published by the Journal of Marine Systems and the Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans. Currently, he is editing two volumes on oceanic fronts to be published by the Journal of Marine Systems and Deep-Sea Research II, and a monograph, “Chemical Oceanography of Frontal Zones” (Springer, 2012).

 

Sei-Ichi Saitoh
Hokkaido University, Japan

Session 2 Invited Speaker

Sei-Ichi Saitoh is a professor of the Faculty of Fisheries Sciences and Center of Sustainability Science at Hokkaido University and also executive adviser at SpaceFish LLP which is a venture company on fisheries information service. He developed and implemented the TOREDAS system (Traceable and Operational Resource and Environment Data Acquisition System). This system provides fishermen with fishing ground forecasts for Japanese common squid, Pacific saury, Skipjack tuna and Albacore tuna. Using satellite communication services, users can generate all products dynamically such as overlaying maps, measuring the distance from nearest port or fishing grounds using the onboard GIS in near-real-time. He specializes in operational fisheries oceanography and satellite oceanography. He was a co-chair for MONITOR Technical Committee of PICES.

 

 

Robert M. Suryan
Oregon State University, U.S.A.

Session 2 Invited Speaker

Robert Suryan is an Assistant Professor – Senior Research at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center. Rob received a Ph.D. from Oregon State University in wildlife science with an emphasis in marine ecology and oceanography in 2006, a M.S. from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories focusing on marine mammal studies in 1995, and a B.S. from Humboldt State University studying wildlife management in 1989. For the past 20 years, Rob has studied the effects of environmental forcing on the reproductive biology, foraging ecology, and population dynamics of marine birds and mammals. He specializes in integrated ecosystem studies working with physical, biological, and fisheries oceanographers and developing programs to integrate and model predator response to changing prey availability or ocean climate. He has used state of the art electronics to study foraging, migration, and dive patterns of seabirds and integrated these data with in-situ and remotely-sensed measures of prey resources or their proxies.

 
Session 3
Population dynamics, trophic interactions and management of cephalopods in the North Pacific ecosystems

Mary Hunsicker
Oregon State University, U.S.A.

Session 3 Invited Speaker

Mary Hunsicker is a post-doctoral research associate in the College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Mary received her Ph.D. from the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. She received a M.S. degree from the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University. Mary’s research interests focus on the trophic ecology and ecosystem services of marine fishes and cephalopods, and the ecological consequences of fishing and climate change on species interactions. Her current work includes identifying environmental conditions that facilitate strong overlap of predator-prey systems in the eastern Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. A key aspect of this work is to improve our understanding and ability to predict how trophic linkages may change under alternate climate scenarios.

 

 

Chingis Nigmatullin
AtlantNIRO, Russia

Session 3 Invited Speaker


Nigmatullin Chingis Muhametovich is a Senior Scientist of the Atlantic Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography (AtlantNIRO), Kaliningrad, Russia.

Graduated from the Kazan State University, the Department of Zoology of Invertebrate (1968) where I specialized in marine zoology and parasitology. Since 1968 until now I've been studying various aspects of biology and fishery of cephalopods of the World Ocean. Main scientific interests are cephalopod biology, fishery ecology and fishery; fishery forecasting; biology of myzostomids; theoretical biology and ecology; ecological parasitology; theory of evolution; epistemology; ethics and philosophy of science.
I participated in more than 20 marine scientific and scientific-fishery expeditions (in total, I spent about 10 years in oceanic cruises) in the seas of Russia and throughout the World Ocean from Arctic to Antarctic (mainly in the tropical zone) including 8 international expeditions. I am an author of a book and 332 scientific publications, embracing cephalopod’s taxonomy, biology, fishery ecology, parasitology and evolution; general and special problems of parasitology and trophic relations, and theoretical ecology and general biology. Among them there are 135 publications in refereed national and international journals.
I was an editor of proceedings of 10 International and All-Russian conferences and 6 volumes of collected papers on marine biology.
I was a member of Cephalopod International Advisory Council (CIAC) in 1991-1997 and 2003-2006 and I am CIAC honorary life member (2009, Vigo). I am a referee for some Russian and international scientific journals. During 1980-1991 I was the deputy of chief of Soviet long-term research program "Fishery squid resources in the World Ocean", my main task was working up of research programs and co-ordination of studies that carried out in different marine institutes of USSR. Since 1971 I have supervised 73 Master Degree students and 6 PhD students.

 

Mitsuo Sakai
National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries, Japan

Session 3 Invited Speaker

Mitsuo Sakai is a leader of Oceanic Squid Group, National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries (NRIFSF). I received a Ph.D from Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, focusing population dynamics of fishery resources in 1986. After receiving a PhD degree, I engaged in technical cooperation projects of JICA on salmon ranching and squid fishery management in Chile and Argentina for 13 years. I started working at 2000 in NRIFSF as a research scientist on fishery biology of oceanic ommastrephid squid resources. Through international collaboration, my main research focus has been on early life ecology, age and growth, reproductive biology of ommastrephid squid, and developmental study on squid fishery sector. In this year I project a research cruise of R/V “Kaiyo Maru” (Fishery Agency, Japan) collaborating with Peruvian scientists of IMARPE to elucidate the recruitment of jumbo flying squid and the reproductive biology in the Peruvian waters.


 
Session 4
Recent changes of North Pacific climate and marine ecosystems: Implications for dynamics of the dominant species

Jürgen Alheit
Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Germany

Session 4 Invited Speaker

Jürgen Alheit received his BSc in Marine Biology from Liverpool University (England) and his PhD in Fisheries from Kiel University (Germany). He has worked inter alia at the Peruvian Fisheries Institue (IMARPE) in Peru, for the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) in Paris and the Alfred-Wegener-Institut in Bremerhaven. His current position is at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde, Germany. He was a member of the Scientific Steering Committee of GLOBEC, a co-founder and co-chair SPACC/GLOBEC and the chair of the German GLOBEC project. His main interest are comparative studies of the impact of climate variability on marine ecosystems in which small pelagic schooling fish are important. His hobby is introducing his colleagues to German Riesling wine.

Jürgen holds the bottle

 

Emanuele Di Lorenzo
Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S.A.

Session 4 Invited Speaker

Dr. Emanuele Di Lorenzo (http://iManu.org) is an Associate Professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S.A. He received his Ph.D. in oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 2003. His research interests and experience span a wide range of topics from physical oceanography to ocean climate and marine ecosystems. More specific focus is on dynamics of basin and regional ocean circulation, inverse modeling, Pacific low-frequency variability, and impacts of large-scale climate variability on marine ecosystem dynamics. In PICES he is co-chair of the Working group on North Pacific Climate Variability & Change and member of the Climate Ocean Variability and Ecosystem Advisory Panel (COVE-AP). He also serves on the US Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem (CAMEO) Science Steering Committee.

 
Session 5
Harmful algal blooms in a changing world

Feixue Fu
University of Southern California, U.S.A.

Session 5 Invited Speaker

Dr. Feixue Fu is a biological oceanographer at the University of Southern California. She received her PhD from the University of Queensland, Australia in 2003. Her major areas of interest are nutrient, micronutrient and CO2 limitation of phytoplankton growth; marine nitrogen fixation; global change effects on microbial communities; biology of cyanobacteria, diatoms, coccolithophorids and dinoflagellates; and iron and phosphorus biogeochemistry. Current projects include examining how phytoplankton trace metal requirements may change in a high CO2 ocean, experimental studies to evaluate acclimation of marine plankton assemblages to climate change, and testing how increased CO2 and temperature affect harmful algal bloom growth and toxicity.

 
Session 6
Identification and characterization of environmental interactions of marine aquaculture in the North Pacific

Shuanling Dong
Ocean University of China, PR China

Session 6 Invited Speaker

Dr. Shuanglin Dong is Vice President of Ocean University of China, in charging of graduate education affairs. He is also a professor of Fisheries College at OUC, focusing on aquaculture ecology and ecology of water systems. Dr. Dong currently is Deputy Director of Fisheries Society of China, Deputy Director of Crustacean Society of China. He was awarded “National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scientists” in 1998 and the second prize for the National Science and Technology Advancement in 2006. Up to date, he has published more than 150 research papers, more than 50 of which were in international journals.

 

Tomoko Sakami
Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan

Session 6 Invited Speaker

Dr. Tomoko Sakami is a researcher of the Stock Enhancement and Aquaculture Division at Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Fisheries Research Agency. She received her Ph.D from the Kyoto University in fisheries microbiology in 1998. She specializes in microbial ecology and has studied the influences of aquaculture to the bacterial activity and species composition in the seawater and sediment. Her current interests are to access the dynamics of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in eutrophic coastal areas by detecting their functional genes.

 
Session 7
Land-sea interactions and anthropogenic impacts on biological productivity of North Pacific Ocean coastal ecosystems

Neil Banas
University of Washington, U.S.A.

Session 7 Invited Speaker

Neil Banas is an coastal and estuarine biophysical oceanographer at the University of Washington Applied Physicsl Laboratory and Affiliate Assistant Professor in the UW School of Oceanography. He received his PhD in Physical Oceanography from the UW in 2005. His research uses a range of numerical models, from small interactive sketches to intensive three-dimensional simulations, to explore the interactions among climate forcing, coastal and estuarine circulation, biochemistry, and planktonic food-web dynamics and behavior, with a focus on U.S. Pacific Northwest waters. He also holds a M.A. in Religious Studies from the University of Colorado and has taught environmental literature through the UW Honors Program and Program on the Comparative History of Ideas since 2001.

 

 

Takayuki Shiraiwa
Hokkaido University, Japan

Session 7 Invited Speaker

Takayuki Shiraiwa is Associate Professor at the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University. He received his MA in geomorphology (1987) and his Ph.D in glaciology (1993) at Hokkaido University. He spent in Antarctica (1993-1995) and in Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (2000-2001) as a visiting scientist to study paleoclimate and environment by means of ice core analyses. Then he became the leader of Amur-Okhotsk Project of the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (Kyoto) to validate a hypothesis that dissolved iron discharged from Amur River controls primary production in the Sea of Okhotsk and the Oyashio open waters. Based on the 5-yrs scientific activities in the difficult fields, he established a multi-lateral science community named “Amur-Okhotsk Consortium” to further activate science discussion on the land-ocean linkage in the Amur Okhotsk region.

 

Vladimir Shulkin
NOWPAP/POMRAC, Russia

Session 7 Invited Speaker

Vladimir Shulkin is a Head of Geochemical Lab in the Pacific Geographical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Far Eastern Branch. He is also a focal point of the NOWPAP POMRAC (Northwest Pacific Action Plan, Pollution Monitoring Regional Activity Center) – one of the UNEP Regional Seas programs. He received his PhD from Shirshov Oceanology Institute in Moscow in 1984. His research interests include geochemical aspects of environmental problems in the coastal areas from the watersheds through the rivers and estuaries to the sea. Contamination by trace metals, excessive load of nutrients and related eutrophication issues, assessment of the water ecosystems quality are the main research fields. He is active at international collaboration with Chinese, Japanese and Korean experts on the water quality monitoring at the NOWPAP activity aiming to make more efficient the joint use of existing data.

 

Jing Zhang
East China Normal University, PR China

Session 7 Invited Speaker

Jing Zhang receiced his PhD from University of Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) in 1988 and then worked as post-doctoral fellow at Ecole Normale Superieure in 1988-1990. His research interest is focused on the biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean. He was Research Fellow at University of Liverpool (1995-1996), Guest Professor at University of Antwerp (1998-1999), and Guest Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2006). He held a professorship at Ocean University of Qingdao and moved to East China Normal University as Cheung Kong Scholars in 1999. He has been involved in a number of international activities, including SCOR/IOC-GEOHAB SSC (1999-2004), SCOR/IGBP-IMBER SSC (2004-2009) and SCOR Committee on Capacity Building.


 
Session 8
Linking migratory fish behavior to end-to-end models

Jerome Fiechter
University of California Santa Cruz, U.S.A.

Session 8 Invited Speaker

Jerome’s research focuses on physical-biological interactions in the ocean. He uses coupled models of ocean circulation and marine ecosystem at different trophic levels to study variability on timescales ranging from weekly to interannual. In the past few years, Dr. Fiechter has been studying the impact of physical processes, such as mesoscale eddies, on phytoplankton production in the Gulf of Alaska, and how assimilation of satellite and in situ observations can improve model predictions and our understanding of ecosystem response to oceanic processes. More recently, he started collaborating on the development of an end-to-end ecosystem model, which will help study connections between climate change, oceanic variability, plankton production, and coastal pelagic fish species, such as anchovies and sardines.

 

Kenneth Rose
Louisiana State University, U.S.A.

Session 8 Invited Speaker

Kenny Rose is the E.L. Abraham Distinguished Professor in Louisiana Environmental Studies in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University. Kenny received his BS in Biology and Mathematics from the University at Albany, and his masters and PhD in fisheries from the University of Washington. His research focuses on the development and use of computer and mathematical modeling for theoretical and applied analyses of aquatic ecosystems. Recently, much of Kenny’s effort has involved spatially-explicit individual-based modeling of fish populations and communities, including developing end-to-end type models. These models have been used to predict responses to various stressors, such as fishing, habitat loss, contaminants, and climate change. Kenny has also been involved in a variety of water allocation issues, such as on the Klamath River and San Francisco estuary. He is a fellow of the AAAS, and has served on variety of review and advisory panels and committees.

 

 
Session 9
How well do our models really work and what data do we need to check and improve them?

Nikolay Diansky
Leibniz Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russia

Session 9 Invited Speaker

Nikolay Diansky received his Ph.D. degree in Physics and Mathematics in 1993 with a thesis “Diagnose and modeling of interseasonal variability of sea surface temperature anomalies in North Atlantic” at the Institute for Numerical Mathematics (INM) of Russian Academy of Sciences where he has held positions since 1991. In 2007, Nikolay Diansky defended doctoral dissertation “Ocean circulation modeling and investigation of its response to short- and long-period atmospheric forcing”. Currently he is a leading researcher at INM.
His main research interests include the development of the ocean general circulation model (Diansky et al. 2002) and coupled ocean–atmosphere general circulation model (Volodin and Diansky, 2006), investigation of ocean-atmosphere interactions (Diansky et al. 1999), high resolution ocean modeling (Diansky et al., 2006).

Nikolay Diansky is responsible for the ocean component of Russian IPCC climate system models INMCM3.0 (CMIP3, IPCC-AR4) and INMCM4.0 (CMIP5).

 

Yoichi Ishikwa
Kyoto University, Japan

Session 9 Invited Speaker

Yoichi Ishikawa obtained PhD of science at Kyoto University in 1999 and is an assistant professor of physical oceanography at Graduate school of Science, Kyoto University and also a researcher at Data research center, JAMSTEC. He have been developed the numerical model of ocean circulation and the data assimilation system, especially using 4-dimensional variation (adjoint) method. The target of the modeling includes coastal region with very high resolution as well as the basin scale with moderate resolution (so called eddy permitting model). Also, he have been constructed the data assimilation system for atmosphere-ocean coupled model to forecast seasonal to interannual variability. Recently, his research interests are development of the data assimilation system for physical and biogeochemical coupled model and its application for fisheries.

 

 

Alexander Kurapov
Oregon State University, U.S.A.

Session 9 Invited Speaker

Alexander Kurapov is an assistant professor of physical oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences (COAS), Oregon State University. After receiving a PhD degree in Fluid Mechanics from the St-Petersburg Marine Technical University (Russia) in 1993, he continued his studies at the University of Cambridge (UK), then Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of Russian Academy of Sciences (St-Petersburg branch, Laboratory for Ocean Modeling), and COAS. Alexander uses coastal and regional ocean circulation models as tools to study wind-driven and tidally driven processes on the shelf and in the adjacent interior ocean. His work on advanced data assimilation has utilized satellite and in-situ observations to improve ocean state estimates and facilitate accurate forecasts. As a result of this effort, he has developed a real-time coastal ocean forecast model centered on Oregon (US West), which is included as a component of the regional Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS). Alexander is a member of the GODAE OceanView Coastal and Shelf Seas Task Team.

 

Shoshiro Minobe
Hokkaido University, Japan

Session 9 Invited Speaker

Dr. Shoshiro Minobe (minobe@mail.sci.hokudai.ac.jp) is a Professor at the Graduate School of Sciences, Hokkaido University, Japan.
His research interests focus on decadal climate variability and air–sea interaction. Included in his publications is a widely-referenced article proposing 50-yr climate variability and an interpretation of climate regime shifts associated with 50-yr and 20-yr climate variability. His paper on the ocean-to-atmosphere influence over the Gulf Stream was featured as the cover article of the journal Nature in 2008. Shoshiro worked as a convenor for several PICES symposium and workshops for decadal climate variability and its relation to marine ecosystem, and as a guest editor of the Progress in Oceanography special issue on "North Pacific Climate Regime Shift" (2000). He also served as a member of the Implementation Plan Writing Team for the PICES scientific program, FUTURE.
He is now working as a co-chair on a new working PICES WG27 "North Pacific Climate Variability and Change".

 

 

Kenneth Rose
Louisiana State University, U.S.A.

Session 9 Invited Speaker

Kenny Rose is the E.L. Abraham Distinguished Professor in Louisiana Environmental Studies in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University. Kenny received his BS in Biology and Mathematics from the University at Albany, and his masters and PhD in fisheries from the University of Washington. His research focuses on the development and use of computer and mathematical modeling for theoretical and applied analyses of aquatic ecosystems. Recently, much of Kenny’s effort has involved spatially-explicit individual-based modeling of fish populations and communities, including developing end-to-end type models. These models have been used to predict responses to various stressors, such as fishing, habitat loss, contaminants, and climate change. Kenny has also been involved in a variety of water allocation issues, such as on the Klamath River and San Francisco estuary. He is a fellow of the AAAS, and has served on variety of review and advisory panels and committees.

 

 
Workshop 1
MEMIP-IV: Quantitative comparison of ecosystem models applied to North Pacific shelf ecosystems--humble pie or glee?

Jerome Fiechter
University of California Santa Cruz, U.S.A.

Workshop 1 Invited Speaker

Jerome’s research focuses on physical-biological interactions in the ocean. He uses coupled models of ocean circulation and marine ecosystem at different trophic levels to study variability on timescales ranging from weekly to interannual. In the past few years, Dr. Fiechter has been studying the impact of physical processes, such as mesoscale eddies, on phytoplankton production in the Gulf of Alaska, and how assimilation of satellite and in situ observations can improve model predictions and our understanding of ecosystem response to oceanic processes. More recently, he started collaborating on the development of an end-to-end ecosystem model, which will help study connections between climate change, oceanic variability, plankton production, and coastal pelagic fish species, such as anchovies and sardines.

 

Yvette Spitz
Oregon State University, U.S.A.

Workshop 1 Invited Speaker

Dr. Yvette Spitz is a professor in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Her research interests include ecosystem dynamics and physical/biological interactions. In the last decade, her research has focused on the development of ecosystem models that can be applied to the world ocean, spanning tropical microbes to ice algae. Her past and present regions of interest include the eastern boundary upwelling region off Oregon, the North Pacific basin and the Arctic Ocean. She is also an expert in data assimilation applied to coupled circulation and ecosystem models.

 
Workshop 2
Remote sensing techniques for HAB detection and monitoring

Joji Ishizaka
Nagoya University, Japan

Workshop 2 Invited Speaker

Joji Ishizaka (jishizak@hyarc.nagoya-u.ac.jp) is a professor of Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University. He obtained his M.Sc. for Environmental Science from Tsukuba University and Ph.D for Oceanography from Texas A&M University. His research interest is remote sensing of primary production and biological response to physical forcing. He is now mostly focusing on the phytoplankton dynamics associated with environmental changes caused by human activities as well as climate changes in the east Asian marginal seas and coastal embayment.
He is a co-chair of CREAMS-AP (Advisory Panel for Circulation Research of East Asian Marginal Sea) of PICES since 2009, a focal point of CEARAC (Special Monitoring & Coastal Environmental Assessment Regional Activity Centre) of NOWPAP (Northwest Pacific Action Plan) since 2007, and a member of IOCCG (International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group) during 1997-2001 and since 2010.

http://co2.hyarc.nagoya-u.ac.jp/

 

Raphael Kudela
University of California Santa Cruz, U.S.A.

Workshop 2 Invited Speaker

Raphael Kudela is a Professor of Ocean Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz. He is Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at UCSC, and is currently Chair of the Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (GEOHAB) programme. His research interests focus on phytoplankton ecology and biological oceanography. Past efforts have included the development of novel bio-optical and remote sensing methods for assessing new and total primary production, estimates of particulate iron and other metals in coastal and estuarine waters, and phytoplankton functional types from ocean color data. Current projects include monitoring and predictive forecasting of harmful algal blooms within the California Current System, and comparisons of high biomass (red tide) dynamics in California and the Benguela Current.

 
Workshop 3
Pollutants in a changing ocean: Refining indicator approaches in support of coastal management

Joel Baker
University Washington Tacoma, U.S.A.

Workshop 3 Invited Speaker

Professor Joel Baker holds the Port of Tacoma Chair in Environmental Science at the University of Washington Tacoma, is the Science Director of the Center for Urban Waters in Tacoma, and is the Executive Director of the Puget Sound Institute. He earned a B.S. degree in Environmental Chemistry from SUNY Syracuse and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Baker's research interests center about the transport of organic contaminants in the environment, specifically atmospheric transport and deposition, aerosol chemistry, the dynamics of contaminant transport in estuaries, and modeling the exposure and transfer of chemicals in aquatic food webs. He teaches courses in water quality modeling, environmental chemistry, and quantitative methods. He has co-authored over ninety papers on contaminant cycling in the Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay and coastal waters, and was the lead author on a scientific review of PCBs in the Hudson River, a contributing author to the Pew Oceans Commission report Marine Pollution in the United States, and a member of the NRC's Committee on Oil in the Sea. Dr. Baker is an ex officio member of the Puget Sound Science Panel, which he chaired from 2007-2009. In 2010, he was awarded the Conservation Research Award by the Seattle Aquarium Society.

 

Kris Cooreman
(ICES/Belgium)

Workshop 3 Invited Speaker

Dr. Kris Cooreman is science director at the Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research, Animal Sciences division on Fisheries in Belgium, Europe. He earned a BSc in biological sciences, MSc in biochemical sciences, MSc in environmental sciences and a PhD in biochemical sciences at the University of Gent (UGent). He joined the institute in 1990 and was previously employed at UGent. He was a lecturer at the Free University of Brussels until 1995 and a technical co-operation expert in Suweon, Republic of Korea in 1998, assigned by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

As a senior researcher, Dr. Cooreman has been involved in multiple national and international co-operative R&D projects e.g. on (intercompartment) distribution of contaminants (persistent organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and C1-C2 organochlorines, heavy metals, organic tin,…) and their biological effects in marine organisms and (European) eel (Anguilla anguilla, residing in fresh water systems) and on food safety issues e.g. sources, consumer exposure and risks of organotin contamination in seafood and integrated evaluation of marine food products: nutritional value, safety & consumer acceptance.

Dr. Cooreman is the national correspondent to the European Commission for the National (fisheries) Data Gathering Programme, member of the ICES expert group on biological effects of contaminants and national delegate at ICES.

 

Annamalai Subramanian
Ehime University, Japan

Workshop 3 Invited Speaker

Professor, Marine Environmental Chemistry at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Japan, since 1st May 2003 Worked at Annamalai University, India from 1976 -2003 as Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor 35 years of research and teaching experience both at Annamalai University, India and Ehime University, Japan in fields related to Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology.

Research interest - Global Status of Pollution by Persistent Toxic Substances.

 
Workshop 4
Recent advances in monitoring and understanding of Asian marginal seas: 5 years of CREAMS/PICES EAST-I Program

Sukgeun Jung
Jeju National University, Korea

Workshop 4 Invited Speaker

Sukgeun Jung is a faculty member majoring in fisheries science at Jeju National University, Korea. Sukgeun received B.Sc. from Seoul National University (oceanography) in 1987, M.S. from National Fisheries University of Pusan (now Pukyong National Unviersity) in 1989, and Ph.D. from University of Maryland, College Park with emphasis in fish ecology and fisheries science in 2002. He worked at Chesapeake Biological laboratory of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences for his PostDoc under Professor Edward D. Houde from 2002 to 2006. After returning to Korea in 2006, he worked as a fisheries researcher at National Fisheries R&D institute (2006-2010). His study areas include fisheries oceanography (climate change), stock assessment/management, fish ecology (anchovy and Pacific cod), mathematical biology, and biostatistics. He worked for the secretariat of Korea PICES committee (2008-2010).Currently, he is a lead author for the Chapter 30 (“Open Oceans”) of the 5-th Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC (2010-2014), and a member of PICES FIS committee (2009-present).

 

Tomoharu Senjyu
Kyushu University, Japan

Workshop 4 Invited Speaker

Tomoharu Senjyu is an associate professor of the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University. He received his PhD from the Tokyo University of Fisheries in 1993. His major areas of interest are physical and chemical processes of formation, circulation, and modification of the deep water in the Japan Sea. Recently, he started the research on the oceanographic connectivity between the Japan and the East China Seas, including the atmosphere over the seas. He has been studied these subjects mainly through field observations. From 2009, he served the current and temperature monitoring through the fisheries activity in the coastal area of the Japan Sea.

 
 
 
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