WWW PICES
PICES 2012 Annual Meeting
Effects of natural and anthropogenic stressors in the North Pacific ecosystems: Scientific challenges and possible solutions
October 12–21, Hiroshima, Japan
Last update - June 25, 2012
Invited Speakers
Session 1 (Science Board Symposium)
Effects of natural and anthropogenic stressors in the North Pacific ecosystems: Scientific challenges and possible solutions

Benjamin Halpern
University of California Santa Barbara, USA

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Dr. Ben Halpern focuses his research at the interface between marine ecology and conservation biology.  His research has addressed a broad range of questions that span local to global scales, including spatial population dynamics, trophic interactions in community ecology, and the interface between ecology and human dynamics, all with the ultimate aim to inform and facilitate conservation and resource management efforts in marine systems.  He received his Ph.D. in marine ecology from UC Santa Barbara and then held a joint post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Smith Fellowship Program sponsored by The Nature Conservancy.  He is currently the Director of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning and a Research Biologist at UC Santa Barbara. He also served as the project lead for a research initiative to evaluate and better inform efforts to do ecosystem-based management (EBM) in marine ecosystems around the world and is the lead scientist for the Ocean Health Index project.

            Ben has led and participated in several key synthetic research projects that have advanced our understanding of the state of the world’s oceans and the potential for marine reserves to improve ocean condition. In particular he has led the development and mapping of cumulative impact assessments at global and regional scales in marine and freshwater systems.  He has also conducted field expeditions in tropical and temperate systems in the Caribbean, Red Sea, Mediterranean, Solomon Islands, Indonesia, various parts of the South Pacific, California and Chile.  

   

Kitack Lee
Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Kitack Lee is a Professor at the School of Environmental Science and Engineering of Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea. His research focuses on understanding the global carbon cycle and the role of the ocean in absorbing CO2 released from human activities. His group has also involved in studying the effect of rising CO2 on marine ecosystems. He has served as a scientific advisor for several international carbon and ocean acidification programs. He was awarded the POSTECH Proud Postechian in 2011 for outstanding research on the impacts of pollutants on ocean environment.

   

William Li
Bedford Institute of Oceanography, DFO, Canada

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

William Li is a research scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Nova Scotia.  He is head of the Marine Ecosystem Section which undertakes federal government science to support sustainability in marine ecosystems.  His current work is on geographic patterns and multiyear trends in microbial plankton discerned from oceanographic monitoring programs.  These include time series observations in the nearshore (Bedford Basin), the continental shelf of Nova Scotia (Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program), the subpolar gyre (Labrador Sea), and the polar gyre (Arctic Ocean).  He is co-chair of the ICES Working Group on Phytoplankton and Microbial Ecology whose members cooperate to report on the ecological status of microbial plankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.  Through academic collaborations, he is involved in aspects of research on microbial biogeochemistry, biodiversity, and macroecology.  He has served on the editorial boards of various international journals for a continuous period of 25 years.

   

Reiji Masuda
Kyoto University, Japan

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Reiji Masuda is an associate professor at the Maizuru Fisheries Research Station, Kyoto University. Reiji received his BSc in biological science at Shizuoka University and his PhD in fisheries science from the Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo. He spent two years in Scotland (Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory) as a post-doc and two years in Hawaii (The Oceanic Institute) as a research scientist until he started working as a research associate in Kyoto University.

His major interest is an ontogeny of behavior in fishes. Schooling behavior and learning capability are the subjects of his focus. As he utilizes methodology of experimental psychology, he calls himself “a fish psychologist”. He is also keen in research using underwater visual census. With this method he recently reported diel, seasonal and interannual variation of fish assemblages, the efficiency of different types of artificial reefs, and the interaction between fish and jellyfish. He also dives in Tohoku area regularly to report the recovery of fish assemblages from the Tsunami catastrophe.

   

Hans W. Paerl
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Hans W. Paerl is Kenan Professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences at the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences, located in Morehead City, NC . His research includes; microbially-mediated nutrient cycling and primary production dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, environmental controls and management of harmful algal blooms, and assessing the effects of man-made and climatic (storms, floods) nutrient enrichment and hydrologic alterations on water quality and sustainability of inland, estuarine, and coastal waters. His studies have identified the importance and ecological impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition as a new nitrogen source supporting estuarine and coastal eutrophication. He is involved in the development and application of microbial and biogeochemical indicators of aquatic ecosystem condition and change in response to human and climatic perturbations. He directs the Neuse River Estuary Modeling & Monitoring Program, ModMon (www.unc.edu/ims/neuse/modmon) and ferry-based water quality monitoring program, FerryMon (www.ferrymon.org), which employs environmental sensors and microbial indicators to assess near real-time ecological condition of the Albemarle-Pamlico Sound System, the USAs second largest estuary. In 2003 he was awarded the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography for his work in these fields and its application to interdisciplinary research, teaching and management of aquatic ecosystems. In 2011 he received the Odum Lifetime Achievement Award from the Estuarine and Coastal Research Federation for his work on the cause and consequences of eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in estuarine and coastal waters.

   

Ian Perry
Pacific Biological Station, DFO, Canada

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Dr. Ian Perry is a senior research scientist with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans, at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, BC, Canada. His research expertise includes the effects of the environment on larval, juvenile and adult stages of finfish and invertebrates; the structure and function of marine ecosystems; ecosystem-based approaches to the management of marine resources; the human dimensions of marine ecosystem changes; methods for providing scientific advice for new and developing fisheries; and scientific leadership of international and inter-governmental programs on marine ecosystems and global change. He heads the Ecosystem Approaches Program at the Pacific Biological Station, and is one of two co-leads for the DFO Strait of Georgia Ecosystem Research Initiative. He is a former Chair of the international Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) program, whose goal was to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations. He is also a former PICES Science Board Chair. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Fisheries Centre of the University of British Columbia, and has taught courses on fisheries oceanography at universities in Canada, Chile, and Portugal. He is an Associate Editor for the journal Ecology and Society, and is a member of the Editorial Boards for Fisheries Oceanography and Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability.

   

Hiroaki Saito
Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, FRA, Japan

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Hiroaki Saito is a head of Ecosystem Dynamics Group at Fisheries Research Agency, Japan. His research interest is the function of marine organisms to food-web dynamics and biogeochemical cycling covering wide range of topics such as life history of zooplankton, biological pump, impact of iron enrichment to HNLC subarctic Pacific, physical oceanographic perturbation on food-web structure and dynamics, etc. He has been served for IGBP/SCOR IMBER programme as a SSC member (2004-2008), chairperson or member of IMBER-Japan (2004-), and leader of IMBER related projects such as DEEP (2007-2012) for the interaction between epipelagic and mesopelagic ecosystems, SUPRFISH (2007-2012) for understanding the mechanism of fish-species alternation, SKED (2011-2021) for the Kuroshio ecosystem dynamics. In PICES, he has been served various groups, and now a chairperson of FUTURE COVE advisory panel, Biological Oceanography committee and Science Board member.  

   

Xuelei Zhang
First Institute of Oceanography, SOA, China

Science Board Symposum 1
Invited Speaker

Xuelei Zhang received his Ph.D. degree from the Ocean University of China in 2003. He holds Research Professor at FIO and is currently the Vice Director of the Marine Ecology Research Center of FIO. He focuses his research on understanding the trends and causes of long term variation of marine ecosystems. Recently he has also devoted in studies using modern multidisciplinary approaches to address issues of marine biological hazards (green tides, jellyfish) and habitat conservation (seagrass, coral, mammals). His studies have concentrated in the Yellow Sea and other temperate coastal seawaters and are developing into the open oceans and tropicals. He was awarded twice for best presentations by PICES at the annual meetings.

 
Session 2
Range extension, toxicity and phylogeny of epiphytic dinoflagellates

Masao Adachi
Kochi University, Japan

Session 2
Invited Speaker

Masao Adachi is a professor of Natural Sciences Cluster at Kochi University located in Nankoku City, Kochi, Japan. He received his Ph.D. in marine microbiology from Kyoto University. After working for a short time as a JSPS (the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) researcher at Kyoto University, he came to Kochi University as a lecturer. His research area includes biogeography and ecophysiology of microalgae causing harmful algal blooms (HABs), development of transformation methods of marine microalgae, including HABs causative species and genetic engineering of microalgae for utilization of algal biomass and bioproducts including biofuels. He collaborated with Dr. Christopher A. Scholin from Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and was involved in the development of the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) as a researcher of Joint Research Projects of JSPS and NSF. Recently he served as the project leader for research sponsored by the Food Safety Commission, Japan, which is focused on the effects of global warming on the expansion of distribution of fish food poisonings such as ciguatera on Japanese coasts.

   

Patricia Tester
National Ocean Service, NOAA, USA

Session 2
Invited Speaker

Pat Tester is an Oklahoma native with graduate oceanography degrees from Oregon State University. Her dissertation research was completed at the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, NC where she joined the NOAA staff in 1979. Since 1987 her focus has been on the ecology and physiology of harmful algae and their effects on marine food webs. Her current research efforts are to facilitate monitoring and detection of HAB species and their toxins to reduce the risk to human health and marine resources. During her career, Pat has addressed Congress, where her testimony helped change the Small Business Administration's definition of disaster to include economic losses due to red tides. Her early work helped pioneer the use of remote sensing in HAB detection. She was recognized with NOAA's Technology Transfer Award in 2007, for her role in the development of a monoclonal ELISA for domoic acid and its transfer to private industry. She is also the recipient of the Phycological Society of America's Provasoli Award, the Tyge Christensen Prize from the International Phycological Society and the Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award. Pat served on two National Academy of Sciences panels and as president of the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae from 2005-2008. She is an active member of the North Pacific Research Board's Science Panel and the Scientific Steering Committee of GOEHAB (IOC-SCOR). In May 2012 Pat's career achievements were honored by the NOAA Distinguished Career Award.

   

Takeshi Yasumoto
National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan

Session 2
Invited Speaker

Takeshi Yasumoto is a Distinguished Research Fellow in the National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan. He was conferred BS, MS and Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo, moved to Tohoku University in 1977 and retired in 1998 to become the Emeritus Professor. His main theme in research is “chemical structures, etiology, and function of marine toxins”. Characteristically, challenges were made to solve structures of large and complex molecules using a very small amount of samples by applying extensivekt spectroscopic methods. Typically, the causative toxins of ciguatera fish poisoning, diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, and red-tide toxins were elucidated. Using the pure toxins thus obtained, he developed analytical methods and explored the origin of the toxins: an endeavor that led to the discovery of epiphytic dinoflagellates such as Gambierdiscus spp., Ostreopsis spp., and Prorocentrum lima. The toxins he supplied contributed to the promotion of pharmacology and toxicology. To commemorate his achievements, The Yasumoto Lifetime Achievement Award was established (2000) in the International Society for the Study of Harmful Algae. At home he was awarded Imperial Prize (2004). His current activity involves structural and analytical chemistry of ciguatoxins and palytoxins.

 
Session 3
Challenges in understanding Northern Hemisphere ocean climate variability and change

Kenneth Drinkwater
Institute of Marine Research, Norway

Session 3
Invited Speaker

Ken Drinkwater is employed at the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen, Norway, and formerly was with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, Canada.  Trained as a physical oceanographer, his research has focused upon the effects of physical oceanography and climate variability on marine ecology, especially fish and fisheries, for over 35 years. Many of his studies have been centered in the northern North Atlantic but he has also been involved in several comparative studies of this region with North Pacific ecosystems, as well as the Antarctic.  Working closely with fisheries scientists and marine biologists, he has sought to understand the mechanisms linking climate and ecological responses at spatial scales spanning from meters to global, and time scales from days to centuries. He has led studies on the impacts of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and multi-decadal variability on the North Atlantic ecosystems.  He is a former chair of the ICES/GLOBEC Cod and Climate Change (CCC) Program and is presently co-chair of the Ecosystems Studies of Sub-Arctic Seas (ESSAS) Program under IMBER. He was co-author of the Marine System chapter in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) to assess possible consequences of climate change on the Arctic and is presently a review editor for the Ocean Systems chapter within Working Group II of the IPCC.  He also sits on the Scientific Steering Committee of IMBER and the Scientific Steering Group of CLIVAR.

   

Young-Oh Kwon
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA

Session 3
Invited Speaker

Dr. Young-Oh Kwon is a scientist in the Physical Oceanography Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He received his Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington in 2003. His research interests revolve around the role of ocean in climate variability on time scales of a few years to several decades. More specific focus is on how the ocean variability associated with the strong western boundary current regions and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) influences the large-scale atmospheric circulation. He addresses these questions using observations archived over the last 50+ years and global climate model simulations. Recently, his interest has expanded into how the basin-scale climate variability impacts the coastal environment and ecology, in particular abundance and distribution of fish in the Northeast U.S. Shelf. He serves on the U.S. AMOC Science Team Executive Committee.

   

Nathan Mantua
University of Washington, USA

Session 3
Invited Speaker

Nate Mantua is an Associate Professor of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. His expertise revolves around climate dynamics and climate impacts on aquatic ecosystems. His research has focused on understanding the dynamics and consequences for natural variations in Pacific climate related to El Nino and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, climate impacts on historical patterns of Pacific salmon production and marine ecosystems. He served on the Pacific Salmon Commission Panel on Fraser River Sockeye Declines, the US Fish and Wildlife Service Expert Panel on Marbled Murrelets, the Royal Society of Canada panel on Climate Change and Ocean Biodiversity, and the National Research Council's study of the Alaska Groundfish Fishery and Stellar Sea Lions. He received an Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from NOAA in 2000. For the past 3 years he has served as the Co-Director for the University of Washington's Climate Impacts Group, an interdisciplinary research team dedicated to increasing the climate resilience for people and nature. He has a B.S. degree from the University of California at Davis, and a PhD from the University of Washington.

   

Yoshi N. Sasaki
Hokkaido University, Japan

Session 3
Invited Speaker

Yoshi N. Sasaki is a research fellow at the Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University in Japan. After receiving his PhD from the Graduate School of Science at Hokkaido University, he worked at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii for about three years. He has been a research fellow at Hokkaido University since 2010. His research interest is interannual to decadal variability in midlatitude atmosphere and ocean. Recently, in order to understand dynamics of decadal variability in ocean jets, such as the Gulf Stream and the Kuroshio Extension, he has developed a theory that extends thin-jet theory for meanders on monthly and seasonal timescales.

   

Akinori Takasuka
National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, FRA, Japan

Session 3
Invited Speaker

Akinori Takasuka is currently a Senior Researcher at National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Fisheries Research Agency (Yokohama, Japan) and an Affiliate Associate Professor of Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology. He received BSc, MSc, and PhD in Agricultural Science from The University of Tokyo. He finished PhD work on growth and survival mechanism during early life history stages of anchovy in 2003. His interests have been directed to the mechanisms of fish population dynamics as a fisheries biologist. The current main topics are biological mechanisms of species alternations, growth-based survival mechanisms during early life stages, and spawning biology of small pelagic fish species.
Website: http://club.pep.ne.jp/~polypterus/index.htm

 

 
Session 4
Monitoring on a small budget: Cooperative research and the use of commercial and recreational vessels as sampling platforms for biological and oceanographic monitoring

Rudy Kloser
CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), Australia

Session 4
Invited Speaker

Dr. Rudy Kloser is a senior research scientist and team leader of the deepwater ecosystems status and predictions group at the CSIRO’s Marine and Atmospheric Research Division, Hobart, Australia. The team provides scientific advice about the structure, function and dynamics of benthic and pelagic ecosystems in light of climate change, variability and human use. Rudy’s specific research area is investigating reflected and ambient acoustic signals in the ocean with associated optical and physical sampling to make ecological inferences about the water column and the seabed, and more broadly to learn about ecosystem function and dynamics. Past efforts have included the development of multi-frequency methods to assess deep water species such as orange roughy and utilisation of fishing industry vessels for monitoring small scale fisheries.  A recent application is the development of bio-acoustic methods for basin scale characterisation of macro zooplanktonic and micronektonic communities using ships of opportunity including fishing and research vessels (http://imos.org.au/basoop.html ). Current research is focused on utilisation of this information into ecological models and indicators as well as the development of acoustic, optical and capture methods. 

 
Session 5
Social-ecological systems on walleye pollock and other commercial gadids under changing environment: Inter-disciplinary approach

Oleg Bulatov
Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography, Russia

Session 5
Invited Speaker

Dr. Oleg Bulatov was born in Yaunpiebalga, Latvia. He graduated from Department of Ichthyology of Kalilningrad State Technical University in 1975. He worked as a researcher, senior scientist and deputy director of the Pacific Research Fisheries Centre (TINRO-Сenter) in 1978-1993 before moving to Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO, Moscow). Oleg participated in many research cruises to Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean. He is currently a Head of Fishery Biology Department. Oleg Bulatov received his PhD  from Institute of Marine Biology (Russian Academy of Science, Vladivostock) in 1984, and a Doctoral degree in Ichthyology from VNIRO in 2004. Main activity: reproduction, stock assessment, Total Allowable Catch (TAC)  of walleye Pollock, climate change.

   

Alan Haynie
Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Russia

Session 5
Invited Speaker

Alan Haynie is an economist at NOAA Fisheries’ Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA.  Alan oversees the development of the spatial economics toolbox for fisheries (FishSET), a U.S. initiative to improve the spatial economic modeling of fisheries. Alan’s research includes work on the spatial analysis of fisheries under changing environmental, stock, and market conditions and with the implementation of catch shares.  His work also explores the design of bycatch reduction incentives and the unintended consequences of marine reserves.  Alan is a PI in the Bering Sea Project and is a member of the NPFMC’s BSAI Groundfish Plan Team.

 
Session 6
Environmental contaminants in marine ecosystems: Seabirds and marine mammals as sentinels of ecosystem health

John Elliott
Science & Technology Branch Environment Canada

Session 6
Invited Speaker

John Elliott is a research scientist with Environment Canada at the Pacific Wildlife Research Centre, Delta, British Columbia. Beginning with his BSc research at Carleton University on impacts of urban runoff on aquatic invertebrates to an MSc on toxicity of PCBs at the University of Ottawa and his PhD on the ecotoxicology of bald eagles from the University of British Columbia, he has always been interested in the application of science to understand and devise solutions to environmental problems. He has actively engaged in regulatory proceedings around topics such as lead projectiles, pulp mill pollutants, various pesticides and brominated flame retardants. As adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University, he continues to supervise graduate students engaged in field and laboratory ecotoxicological research, particularly with top predators. He has lectured and given courses in wildlife toxicology in North America and Europe. His publication record includes more than 150 peer reviewed papers, book chapters and reports.

   

Atsuhiko Isobe
Ehime University, Japan

Session 6
Invited Speaker

Dr. Atsuhiko Isobe is a professor at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University. His research interests focus on air-sea interaction processes, dynamics of ocean circulation in shelf/coastal waters, and material transport including beach litter issue. Currently, he is the principal investigator of a beach-litter research project (FY2007-FY2012) supported by the Environmental Research and Technology Development Fund of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan. During the last five years, he and his young colleagues have developed a numerical model for beach-liter forecast, monitoring system of beach litter using webcams, and measurement procedure of toxic metals carried by plastic litter. In addition, they have shared their research outcomes with the general public through the “beach-litter science café” held at various places in Japan.

   

Andy Sweetman
Centre for Chemical Management, Lancaster University, UK

Session 6
Invited Speaker

Andy Sweetman is a Senior Research Fellow within the Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) and Director of the Centre for Chemicals Management within LEC. His primary research interests involve the investigation the fate and behaviour of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on UK, European and global scales. Much of his research, funded by Defra, involves the use and development of mathematical models to determine the fate and behaviour of chemicals in the environment and to improve the risk assessment process. This work has culminated in the development of a range of predictive models which operate on a range of spatial and temporal scales, which is important as the type of model required often relies on the questions being asked by policy makers or researchers.  As a result of working within this field, I have gained experience of a wide range of models and approaches, and have developed an understanding of the processes and parameters that drive such models. He also manages the Defra funded Toxic Organic Micro Pollutants (TOMPs) Network, which has operated since 1991, which provides ambient air data for a range of POPs at six sites across England and Scotland. Andy is also director of the Continuing and Professional Development programme on chemicals regulation and is the industrial liaisons partner for LEC with the REACH Centre Ltd. He is also working with waste technology companies and companies interested in sensors and networks, and the beneficial use of environmental nanomaterials.

   

Hideshige Takada
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan

Session 6
Invited Speaker

Position : Professor, Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Tokyo

Hideshige Takada was born in 1959. He received his Ph.D. from the Tokyo Metropolitan University (Environmental Organic Geochemistry) in 1989. He has been working in Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology as an assistant professor, an associate professor, and a professor for 26 years. His speciality is a trace analysis of organic micropollutants. The target compounds include persistent organic pollutants (POPs; e.g., PCBs, DDTs, PAHs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (e.g., nonylphenol, bisphenol A), pharmaceuticals (e.g., triclosan, sulfamethoxazole) as well as anthropogenic molecular markers (e.g., linear alkylbenzenes, coprostanol, artificial sweeteners, benzothiazoles, crotamition). His research field encompasses from Tokyo Bay and its vicinities to Southeast Asian to Africa.

In 2005, Hideshige Takada started International Pellet Watch, global monitoring of POPs by using beached plastic resin pellets (http://www.pelletwatch.org/). He has been working with ~ 50 NGO and individuals who have concern about marine plastic pollution. International Pellet Watch tells us the risk associated with chemicals accumulated in plastic debris in marine environments and their potential adverse effects on marine ecosystem.

Hideshige Takada is an author of more than 100 peer-reviewed papers in international journals and more than 20 invited conferences.

   

Rei Yamashita
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan

Session 6
Invited Speaker

Rei Yamashita graduated in Biological Oceanography from Mie University in 2002 and received PhD in Fisheries Sciences (Marine Environment and Bioresources) from Hokkaido University in 2008. She is associated with Laboratory Of Geochemistry (LOG), Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, since 2005. She started studying the distribution of marine plastic debris in the North Pacific Ocean from 2000 and involved on the analyses of POPs in plastic debris and seabirds tissues. She has focused on the behavior of marine plastic debris as a carrier of toxic chemicals and its effects on seabirds through ingestion. Eventually, she has developed the method of ‘non-invasive sampling’ in seabirds’ using preen gland oil.

 
Session 7
Jellyfish in marine ecosystems and their interactions with fish and fisheries

Thomas K. Doyle
University College Cork, Ireland

Session 7
Invited Speaker

Tom Doyle is a research fellow at the Coastal & Marine Research Centre, University College Cork, Ireland. He awarded his PhD in 2007 on the foraging ecology of leatherback sea turtles. Since 2003, Tom’s research has focused on assessing the broadscale distribution and abundance of jellyfish, especially mapping prey fields (jellyfish) for jellyvores (leatherbacks and sunfish). More recently he has investigated the socio-economic impacts of jellyfish, particularly assessing the impacts of harmful jellyfish blooms on the finfish aquaculture industry and open water bathers. He routinely conducts visual surveys for jellyfish from platforms of opportunity (passenger ferries) and aircraft, but also collects jellyfish bycatch data from fisheries surveys. To determine horizontal and vertical movements of jellyfish, Tom has equipped jellyfish with pressure-sensitive data loggers and acoustic tags. He is a PI on two jellyfish projects: 1) EcoJel “Managing the detrimental impacts and opportunities of jellyfish in the Irish Sea” and 2) GilPat “An investigation into gill pathologies in marine reared finfish”. In 2009 Tom addressed the EU Parliament’s Seas and Coastal Areas Intergroup on the invasion of jellyfish.

   

William M. Graham
University of Southern Mississippi, USA

Session 7
Invited Speaker

William “Monty” Graham has been researching ecology of gelatinous plankton since his undergraduate years in coastal North Carolina. Though Monty’s interest in ‘jellies’ is broad ranging from physiology of individuals to global patterns of populations, his primary research explores the causes and consequences of jellyfish variability in heavily fished ecosystems. He has pursued collaborative research from Croatia to Palau to Argentina, and his recent involvement in a synthesis of jellyfish blooms through the National center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at UC-Santa Barbara recently resulted in the single largest database on historical jellyfish data. He attended Centre College in his home state of Kentucky and graduated from University of North Carolina at Wilmington. He received both his masters and doctorate from the University of California-Santa Cruz. Following a brief post-doctoral position at UC-Santa Barbara, he worked as a Senior Marine Scientist at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama for 16 years. He is currently Professor and Chair of Marine Science at The University of Southern Mississippi, a department located at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center.

   

Reiji Masuda
Kyoto University, Japan

Session 7
Invited Speaker

Reiji Masuda is an associate professor at the Maizuru Fisheries Research Station, Kyoto University. Reiji received his BSc in biological science at Shizuoka University and his PhD in fisheries science from the Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo. He spent two years in Scotland (Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory) as a post-doc and two years in Hawaii (The Oceanic Institute) as a research scientist until he started working as a research associate in Kyoto University.

His major interest is an ontogeny of behavior in fishes. Schooling behavior and learning capability are the subjects of his focus. As he utilizes methodology of experimental psychology, he calls himself “a fish psychologist”. He is also keen in research using underwater visual census. With this method he recently reported diel, seasonal and interannual variation of fish assemblages, the efficiency of different types of artificial reefs, and the interaction between fish and jellyfish. He also dives in Tohoku area regularly to report the recovery of fish assemblages from the Tsunami catastrophe.

 
Session 8
Linking migratory fish behavior to End-to-End models II

Robert Humston
Washington and Lee University, USA

Session 8
Invited Speaker

Robert Humston is an Associate Professor in the Biology Department and the Environmental Studies Program at Washington and Lee University.  His research focuses on the ecology of fish and fisheries, with an emphasis on how dispersal and movement behavior effect spatial dynamics in populations.  He is particularly interested in how these spatial dynamics can be incorporated into models to direct management of fisheries.  His general interest in quantitative methods to investigate spatial population dynamics have allowed him to study a variety of systems and taxa ranging from pelagic tunas to invasive plants.   Current projects in his lab synthesize individual movement history reconstructed from otolith chemistry with data on genetic structure and differentiation among populations in river-tributary networks to determine effective population exchange and behavioral mechanisms of natal philopatry.  He received bachelor’s degrees in Biology and English from Bowdoin College and a PhD in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

 
Session 9
Ecological functions and services associated with marine macrophyte communities as indicators of natural and anthropogenic stressors in nearshore zones of the North Pacific

Masakazu Hori
National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea, Japan

Session 9
Invited Speaker

Masakazu Hori is a senior researcher of Macrophyte & Tidal habitat group, National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea (FEIS), Fisheries Research Agency. He received a Ph.D. from Hokkaido University in Fisheries Science with an emphasis in Marine Environment and Resources in 2003. He specializes in community ecology and has studied the effects of environmental change on the biological interactions and food web dynamics in rocky shore and seagrass/sargassum bed. His current research interests focus on the ecosystem functionings and services of coastal foundation species, and the interactions with benthic food-web dynamics and biodiversity in seascape level. His major projects include clarifying the effects of coastal seascape diversity and structure on fish production and distribution, to make a linkage between fishery management and environmental conservation in coastal ecosystems. He has used an approach integrating community and landscape ecology using manipulative experiment, remotely-sensed measures and GIS.

   

Katsumasa Yamada
National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan

Session 9
Invited Speaker

Katsumasa Yamada is a post-doctoral research associate in the Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem Studies (CEBES), National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). He received a Ph.D. from the Chiba University in marine community ecology in 2008. He specializes in evaluation of pattern of community (species composition) dynamics associated with ecosystem functions (functional diversity) in seagrass and seaweed beds, sandy/muddy tidal flats and rocky intertidal zones. His research interests focus on the ecosystem functionings of macrofauna and fishes, and the ecological consequences of habitat connectivity (i.e., linkages) among various substratum patches at coastal areas. A key aspect of this work is to propose how to manage coastal areas for the sustainable use of fishery resources as well as conservation of coastal ecosystems.

 
Session 10
Ecosystem responses to multiple stressors in the North Pacific

Natalie Ban
James Cook University, Australia

Session 10
Invited Speaker

Natalie Ban is a research fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University in Australia. Natalie received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from McGill University (geography) in 1997 and 1999 respectively, and her PhD from the University of British Columbia’s Fisheries Centre (resource management and environmental studies) in 2008. Her research interests span conservation biology, marine spatial planning, conservation planning and implementation, and evaluation and mapping of cumulative impacts in the oceans. Natalie’s current research focuses on identifying options for the conservation of biodiversity whilst respecting people’s needs and uses of resources. She has been a research fellow at James Cook University since 2008.

 
Session 11
Effects of natural and artificial calamities on marine ecosystems and the scheme for their mitigation

Josef Cherniawsky
Institute of Ocean Sciences, Canada

Session 11
Invited Speaker

Josef Cherniawsky is a Research Scientist at the Institue of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Sidney, BC. He is a graduate of McGill University (Physics), University of Victoria (Physics and Astronomy) and University of British Columbia (Physical Oceanography). His current research includes analyses of satellite altimetry and coastal data to study ocean tides and long-term changes in sea level and observations and modelling of tsunami wave hazards on the west coast of Canada. Analyses of alongtrack altimetry data proved to be very useful, leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of tidal constituents and numerical tidal models, which in turn resulted in more detailed descriptions of generation and propagation of long-period eddies, of surface signatures of internal tides, of water transports through subarctic straits, and of sea level changes in marginal seas and in the Global Ocean. His work on modelling tsunami waves is focused on likely effects on Vancouver Island communities from tsunami waves generated from a future megathrust earthquake along the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). These tsunami waves may be comparable to the waves which struck Indonesia during the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, or to the destructive waves which flooded coastal Japanese cities and towns in March of 2011. Notably, the last CSZ subduction earthquake and tsunami was in 1700. Its waves crossed the Pacific Ocean and were recorded by observers on the coast of Japan as an "orphan tsunami" (without a preceding earthquake), thus providing strong evidence about the timing, spatial characteristics and the magnitude of this event.

   

Shin-ichi Ito
Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan

Session 11
Invited Speaker

Shin-ichi Ito is Head of the Physical Oceanography Group in Tohoku National Fisheries Research Institute of the Fisheries Research Agency in Japan . Dr. Ito completed his graduate work in Physical Oceanography at Hokkaido University. His main research interest the relation between ocean properties and circulation and marine ecosystems, particularly in the subarctic Oyashio Current and mixed water region where it collides with the warm Kuroshio Current east of Japan. He deployed more than 40 moorings and water gliders, and his research work includes the development of a fish growth model coupled to the lower-trophic-level ecosystem model NEMURO.FISH (North Pacific Ecosystem Model for Understanding Regional Oceanography For including Saury and Herring).

Dr. Ito is Co-Chairman of the GLOBEC Ecosystem Studies of Sub-Arctic Seas Working Group on Modeling Ecosystem Response. Within the PICES North Pacific Marine Science Organization he has served as a member of the Physical Oceanography and Climate Committee (POC), FUTURE SOFE Advisory Panel, WG27 on North Pacific Climate Variability and Change, WG29 on Regional Climate Modeling and Section on Climate Change Effects on Marine Ecosystems (S-CCME).

   

Nikolai Maximenko
International Pacific Research Center, USA

Session 11
Invited Speaker

Nikolai Maximenko is Senior Researcher at the International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) and affiliate researcher in the Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa. Dr. Maximenko has been with the IPRC since 1999, coming from the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. Since obtaining his PhD in 1986 he built up expertise in ocean circulation, starting from the data processing of Eulerian current meters during polygon experiments to measuring currents with Lagrangian drifting buoys to synthesizing in situ and satellite observations as a member of the NASA Ocean Surface Topography and Ocean Salinity Science Teams. Nikolai has been also heading up a team that is developing computer models of ocean currents to chart the likely paths of marine debris, floating in the World Ocean. Using his models, he predicted the presence of 5 major “garbage patches,” which now have all been found. Since the March 11, 2011 tsunami in Japan, Maximenko and his team have been using up-to-date information about currents and winds to predict debris trajectories. These predictions are now confirmed by observations and help to better prepare for the debris impact on Hawaii and the North Pacific coast line.

   

Stanley Rice
University of Tampa, USA

Session 11
Invited Speaker

Stanley Rice is the Habitat and Marine Chemistry program manager, and a senior investigator of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.  Dr. Rice initiated a team to study oil effects on fish at Auke Bay Lab in 1971, in anticipation of the conflicts that would follow between oil development and fisheries in Alaska.  The early studies were focused on acute toxicity and short  term effects, but have evolved over time to focus on long term persistence and long term damage from spills.   He currently supervises a team of biologists and chemists that have been investigating the biological damages from the 1989 spill, and are gathering information in anticipation of spills in the Arctic.   Relative to the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the team has published more than 150 papers, including some syntheses; papers range from long term persistence of oil, to effects on many species, including pink salmon, herring, sea otters and killer whales.   Our present interest continues to focus on the persistence of oil in habitats, and the long term significance of that persistent oil, particularly to the early life stages of fish.  Embryo toxicity studies on pink salmon and herring demonstrated sensitivities (low parts per billion PAH) and long term effects to exposures;  long term consequences from early life stage exposures have been measured in the field and in controlled laboratory tests  on growth, survival, and returning adults.   Although lingering oil still persists some 23 years later, it is encouraging that lingering effects are relatively localized, and the Prince William Sound is healthy, productive, but not the same as prior to the spill.   

   

Masahiro Yamao
Hiroshima University, Japan

Session 11
Invited Speaker

As a socio-economic scientist, I have conducted surveys in fisheries and rural development in Asia, particularly Southeast Asia.  My particular concerns are sustainable use of coastal resource, institutional development of resource management such as community-based and decentralized approach, livelihood strategy of fishing households and community, and so on. Dynamic change in fisheries trade is another important topic in the recent surveys. Global and regional development of fisheries trade greatly influences on sea food chains consisting of producers, processors, traders, whatever type of fisheries-related businesses, and consumers. Ever-growing consumers’ market sphere of sea food affects utilization of aquatic resources.  Food security and food safety should be secured and achieved through regional and global cooperation among countries.  I had conducted a series of survey on the recovery process of Sumatra Earthquake and Great Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004, with focusing on fisheries and their related industries.  Lessons learned through their experiences on strengthening social resilience may provide a profound insight into community-driven and people’s demanded approach in earthquake and tsunami affected areas in East Japan. ( http://home.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/~yamao)

 
Session 12
Advances in understanding the North Pacific Subtropical Frontal Zone Ecosystem

Hiromichi Igarashi
Data Research Center for Marine-Earth Science, JAMSTEC, Japan

Session 12
Invited Speaker

Hiromichi Igarashi is a research engineer of Data Research Center for Marine-Earth Sciences (DrC) in Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). He received his M.S. in hydrometeorology at the University of Tsukuba. After short-term working in National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), he joined JAMSTEC as a member of the ocean data assimilation group in 2002. His previous studies include the impact of seasonal to interannual variation of global-scale climate events such as ENSO, monsoon and PDO, on the regional water redistribution, and its prediction by using a leading-edge 4D-VAR ocean data assimilation system (DAS), and an atmosphere-ocean coupled DAS successfully developed by our group. And his recent work has focused on the application of ocean reanalysis products to the identification of fish abundance areas and the fishery stock assessment, especially for neon flying squid in the North Pacific.

 
Session 13
Risk management in coastal zone ecosystems around the North Pacific

Erlend Moksness
Institute of Marine Research, Norway

Session 13
Invited Speaker

Erlend Moksness is currently working as Regional Research Director at the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) in Norway. His background is in recruitment processes in marine fishes, fish ageing, stock enhancement of marine fishes, integrated ESE (Ecosystem, Social and Economic) modeling, Surplus Production Modeling, MPA (Marine Protected Area) and aquaculture of marine fishes.  He has published more than 100 per reviewed scientific articles and co-editor of 11 proceedings and scientific books. As Research Director he have established the IMR Advice and Research Program on Coastal Zone Ecosystem and played an active role in establishing a WG within ICES on coastal zone issues (ICES WG on Integrated Coastal Zone Management; WGICZM; established in 2005).  In addition he is responsible for the research cooperation with NOAA (USA), DFO (Canada) and with countries in Latin-America. He represents IMR in Marine Board (ESF).

 
Session 14
Changing ocean biogeochemistry and its ecosystem impacts

Curtis Deutsch
University California Los Angeles, USA

Session 14
Invited Speaker

Dr. Deutsch is an Associate Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of California in Los Angeles.His research is aimed at understanding the interactions between climate and ecosystems.By combining large-scale datasets and models of varying complexity, his work has revealed new ways in which climate produces spatial pattern and temporal variability in ecosystems, and thus influences their basic functioning.Most of this work has focused on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean, with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms that regulate the cycles of nutrients and oxygen on time scales from decades to millennia. He also works at the interface between thermal physiology and terrestrial ecology to understand patterns of terrestrial biodiversity and its response to climate change. He received his B.S. from Oberlin College and a PhD from Princeton University.

   

Akihiko Murata
JAMSTEC, Japan

Session 14
Invited Speaker

Akihiko Murata is the team leader of Ocean Circulation Research Team, Ocean Climate Change Research Program, Research Institute for Global Change (RIGC), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). Akihiko became a researcher of JAMSTEC in 1997. Since then, he has joined many R/V Mirai’s cruises, which were conducted in 5 oceans: North Pacific, South Pacific, South Atlantic, Indian and Arctic Oceans. In these scientific cruises, he took charge of measuring oceanic CO2-system properties such as dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, partial pressure of CO2, and pH. Now he is engaged in Repeat Hydrography surveys on ocean climate change studies with his colleagues. His principal interest is decadal changes of anthropogenic CO2 stored in the ocean interior, but he also has an interest in biogeochemical feedback related to oceanic CO2 and acidification.

   

Brad Seibel
University of Rhode Island, USA

Session 14
Invited Speaker

Brad Seibel is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Rhode Island. He received his Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1998. He studies physiological adaptations of marine animals to extremes of temperature, oxygen and carbon dioxide. He studied the impacts of purposeful carbon sequestration on deep-sea animals, the metabolism and locomotion of polar organisms at low temperature and the effects of carbon dioxide on organisms thought to be sensitive to ocean acidification. Most recently he has focused on the hypoxia tolerance of animals in oceanic oxygen minimum layers. He has shown that many species suppress metabolism during diel forays into the oxygen minimum layer, which alters the biogeochemical cycles that are dependent on these organisms.

 
Workshop 1
Identifying critical multiple stressors of North Pacific marine ecosystems and indicators to assess their impacts

Natalie Ban
James Cook University, Australia

Workshop 1
Invited Speaker

Natalie Ban is a research fellow at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University in Australia. Natalie received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from McGill University (geography) in 1997 and 1999 respectively, and her PhD from the University of British Columbia’s Fisheries Centre (resource management and environmental studies) in 2008. Her research interests span conservation biology, marine spatial planning, conservation planning and implementation, and evaluation and mapping of cumulative impacts in the oceans. Natalie’s current research focuses on identifying options for the conservation of biodiversity whilst respecting people’s needs and uses of resources. She has been a research fellow at James Cook University since 2008.

 
Workshop 3
The feasibility of updating prey consumption by marine birds, marine mammals, and large predatory fish in PICES regions

Robert Olson
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, USA

Workshop 3
Invited Speaker

Robert Olson is a senior scientist with the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission, at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, CA, USA. He heads the ecosystem studies program of the IATTC. His research involves various aspects of food-web dynamics in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP) using diet analyses, stable isotope analyses, and ecosystem modeling. Recent collaborative work includes mechanisms of the tuna-dolphin association in the ETP, intra-guild predation on tunas, ecological metrics of purse-seine fishing for tunas, trophic ecology of myctophid fishes in the ETP, amino-acid compound specific isotope analysis of the ETP food web, ecological risk assessment, and the role of squids in open-ocean ecosystems. He is co-chair of IMBER-CLIOTOP Working Group 3, Trophic Pathways in Open-Ocean Ecosystems, and has participated in three working groups sponsored by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis of the USA National Science Foundation.

 
Workshop 2
Secondary production: measurement methodology and its application on natural zooplankton community

Lidia Yebra
Oceanographic Center of Málaga, Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO), Spain

Workshop 2
Invited Speaker

Dr. Lidia Yebra is a senior researcher at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (Centro Oceanográfico de Málaga, IEO), Spain. Dr. Yebra is a zooplankton ecologist with special interest in zooplankton production at oceanic scale. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in biological oceanography in 2002. Her interests include production of planktonic organisms, biological oceanography (interactions between hydrography and zooplankton physiology), optimization and application of biochemical/molecular techniques in marine biology, and population dynamics in relation to climate change. She has been actively involved in developing new biochemical techniques to estimate growth of zooplankton, an expertise she will share with us during the workshop. Ongoing themes of her research are the effect of eutrophication on coastal secondary production and the transfer of energy through the food web (lower trophic levels to small pelagic fish larvae). In ICES she is member or the Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology (WGZE).

 
Workshop 4
Subarctic–Arctic interactions

Seth Danielson
University of Alaska Fairbanks, U.S.A.

Workshop 4
Invited Speaker

Seth Danielson is a research scientist at the Institute of Marine Science within the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.  He received his Bachelor’s degree from Lehigh University in 1990 (Electrical Engineering) and his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1996 and 2012 (Oceanography).  He specializes in continental shelf processes of Alaska’s marginal seas through analysis of observational data and numerical model results.  Past and ongoing studies include participation in the US GLOBEC Northeast Pacific Gulf of Alaska surveys, Gulf of Alaska oceanographic station GAK1 long-term monitoring, analysis and interpretation of moored data sets from the Beaufort, Chukchi and Bering seas, analysis of the Glacier Bay hydrographic time series in Southeast Alaska, and satellite-tracked drifter deployments in the Bering and Chukchi Seas.  These efforts inform ecosystem studies, climate studies, fisheries management, and oil spill response planning.  Current work includes development of a better mechanistic understanding of the controls that modulate the circulation, temperature, and salinity fields over the Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves and development of better bathymetric digital elevation models for the western Arctic and North Pacific.

   

Ichiro Imai
Hokkaido University, Japan

Workshop 4
Invited Speaker

Ichiro Imai is a Professor at the Plankton Laboratory, Hokkaido University. Since April 2011 he has been a Vice President of the Plankton Society of Japan. Prof. Imai's main area of study includes:

  1. Discovery of the cysts of the fish-killing raphidophyte Chattonella from the sediments of the Seto Inland Sea, and the bloom dynamics in relation with life cycle, cyst physiology, and seed-population dynamics.
  2. Biological control of HABs utilizing nutrient-competing diatoms through germination of resting stage cells in bottom sediments by artificial perturbation and lifting of sediments in coastal sea.
  3. Prevention of HABs occurrences by using of algicidal bacteria inhabiting on the surface of seaweeds and seagrasses: importance restoration of seagrass beds and seaweed beds from the reclamation.
  4. Life cycle of diatoms, dinoflagellates and raphidophytes in coastal sea.
   

Eiji Watanabe
JAMSTEC, Japan

Workshop 4
Invited Speaker

Eiji Watanabe belongs to the Marine Ecosystem Research Team of Environmental Biogeochemical Cycle Research Program, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). PhD degree was awarded from Graduate School of Science at University of Tokyo in 2008. Title of doctoral dissertation is “Modeling study on Pacific water transport in the Arctic Ocean”. Since then, he was employed as a research scholar at International Arctic Research Center (IARC), University of Alaska Fairbanks until 2010, and participates in the Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (AOMIP) even afterwards. Topics of research activities are categorized into 1) interannual variations in Arctic sea ice and freshwater, 2) eddy-induced transport of Pacific-origin water from Chukchi Shelf to Canada Basin, and 3) lower-trophic marine ecosystem along Pacific water pathway in Beaufort Sea. Major research method is numerical climate modeling. He applied a coupled sea ice-ocean general circulation model (GCM) developed at University of Tokyo to the Arctic region and is working on the improvement of eddy-resolving configuration for recent several years.

Website: http://www.geocities.jp/ejnabe_arctic/

 
Workshop 6
The contrasting cases of HABs in the eastern and western Pacific in 2007 and 2011

Sanae Chiba
JAMSTEC, Japan

Workshop 6
Invited Speaker

Current Job:
Senior Scientist at the Research Institute of Global Change, JAMSTEC, Japan.

School:
Ph.D: Tokyo University of Fisheries, Department of Fisheries, 2000
Dissertation: “Zooplankton community structure in the eastern Indian Ocean sector, Antarctica"

Expertised research area:
• Biological oceanography
• Retrospective analysis on long-term change in the lower trophic level ecosystem

Since being employed by JAMSTEC in 2000, I have been studying interaction among climate, upper ocean environment and lower trophic level ecosystem in annual to interdecadal time scales and in the western North Pacific using historically collected observational data set, such as the Odate Collection. Since 2009, my Japanese colleagues and I started participating in the North Pacific Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey, which has been operated by Sir Alister Hardy Foundation of Ocean Science (SAHFOS) and endorsed by PICES. Having been working in the international communities for basin to global scale comparison on marine ecosystem variation, my particular interest is to understand regionally specific ecosystem responses toward the global scale environmental perturbations, which are caused by natural and anthropogenic forcing.

   

William Peterson
Hatfield Marine Science Center, NMFS, USA

Workshop 6
Invited Speaker

Bill Peterson is perhaps best known for his biweekly oceanographic cruises along the Newport Line, a program that measures hydrographic conditions and samples nutrients, chlorophyll, copepods and krill at 7 stations in shelf and slope waters off Oregon.  This program began in 1996 and is now its 17th year.  The highlights are perhaps (1) the demonstration that the PDO and copepod species composition are correlated, and (2) that salmon returns to the Columbia River and coastal rivers of Oregon can be predicted from data on the biomass of the "northern lipid-rich" copepods, Calanus marshallae, Pseudocalanus mimus and Acartia longiremis.  Bill has been active in PICES since 1998; his long term interest is working out how climate variability and change will effect marine food chains in the northern California Current.

 
 
Workshop 7
Global patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems

William Li
Bedford Institute of Oceanography, DFO, Canada

Workshop 7
Invited Speaker

William Li is a research scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Nova Scotia.  He is head of the Marine Ecosystem Section which undertakes federal government science to support sustainability in marine ecosystems.  His current work is on geographic patterns and multiyear trends in microbial plankton discerned from oceanographic monitoring programs.  These include time series observations in the nearshore (Bedford Basin), the continental shelf of Nova Scotia (Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program), the subpolar gyre (Labrador Sea), and the polar gyre (Arctic Ocean).  He is co-chair of the ICES Working Group on Phytoplankton and Microbial Ecology whose members cooperate to report on the ecological status of microbial plankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.  Through academic collaborations, he is involved in aspects of research on microbial biogeochemistry, biodiversity, and macroecology.  He has served on the editorial boards of various international journals for a continuous period of 25 years.

 
 
 
 
 
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